Barack Obama was touted as the first truly 21st century President, more in touch with the youth of America then any man ever before him to hold the highest office in the world. His campaign masterfully used every technological advancement at their disposal to get his message out to potential voters, and it worked masterfully propelling him into the Oval Office.

From Wired 2/14/2008:

The use of technology like blogs, mass texting and online phone banks has been key to Sen. Barack Obama’s surprise sweep of recent primaries.

The Illinois senator’s campaign has been making use of a range of technologies — from ringtones to SMS — to inspire Obamamania. And it’s working. Obama’s recent parade of victories in the primaries has given him a slight lead over Sen. Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination.

“They’ve been using [texting] to get out the vote, which is incredibly smart because it gives people a way to take immediate political action,” says Julie Germany, director of the Institute for Politics, Democracy and the Internet. “It’s just what mobile technology is suited for.”

The Illinois senator is not the only candidate whose campaign is using online technology and mobile phones, but his has been one of the most effective in its embrace of new tech strategies.

From Barack Obama’s own campaign site:
[link opens .PDF file]

Barack Obama understands the immense transformative power of technology and innovation and how they can improve the lives of all Americans. He sees that technology offers the tools to create real change in America. Obama’s forward-thinking 21st century technology and innovation policy starts by recognizing that we need to connect all citizens with each other to engage them more fully and directly in solving the problems that face us. In tandem with that goal, Barack Obama understands that we must use all available technologies and methods to open up the federal government, creating a new level of transparency to change the way business is conducted in Washington and giving Americans the chance to participate in government deliberations and decision making in ways that were not possible only a few years ago.

Barack Obama is already using technology to transform presidential politics and to help unprecedented numbers of citizens take back the political process. Obama’s Internet campaign is only the beginning of how Obama would harness the power of the Internet to transform government and politics. On barackobama.com, voters have connected not only with the campaign but with each other; the campaign has used technology to engage those who have not been able to participate in prior presidential campaigns. More than 280,000 people have created accounts on barackobama.com.

Now the man who embraced technology like no other candidate before him, the man who even in campaign ads mocked his opponent John McCain for “not knowing how to use a computer” The same man whose Blackberry is practically another appendage, claims he doesn’t know how to work modern Ipads, Ipods, Xboxes or Playstations. Yet when he was President-elect Obama, he had this to say about his Blackberry:

“I’m still clinging to my BlackBerry,” Mr. Obama said Wednesday in an interview with CNBC and The New York Times. “They’re going to pry it out of my hands.”

Now the same man who used technology and the rise of the information age to elevate himself to the highest office in the world, is claiming that too much media “…is putting new pressures on our country and on our democracy.”

No information is not putting too much pressure on our nation Mr. Obama, Information is putting too much pressure on your agenda to brainwash the masses into allowing you to destroy everything that is great about our nation. Now you are scared of an educated populace, because you know that the more that the people know about your nefarious plans to destroy the founding principles of our great nation, the weaker your grip of power gets.

Obama is a savvy politician, he knows that knowledge will set you free. That fact scares the crap out of him.

More on this from Nick Rizutto.